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Category: Kink Philosophy

Size Erotica: Carried Away

(Themes include unexpected growth, building destruction, some physical danger for the Giant and the tiny, a Giant in a tight space, bruises and light injury, breast play, oral sex, vaginal insertion, some feelings, and puns.)

 

Sex + humor + size kink

Sometimes you just want to write some funny sex scenes. And sometimes those sex scenes grow into stories in their own right.

I’m pleased to present Carried Away, a 5000-word F/f growth story inspired by @SunnyDLiteNSFW and this tweet:

I’m not quite sure how, but that idea grew into this:

“Right here. Right now. Focus on me and how I feel inside you.” Carrie raised her hips ever so slightly, tightening her muscles in response. They moaned together, heedless of the rubble shifting around them. 

“Oh, God, Meg.” Carrie’s heartbeat was pounding. She accidentally swelled larger, her hands gripping a broken table and a metal filing cabinet so hard that one splintered and the other dented. She rocked her hips slightly, a begging motion, the universal signal for fuck me harder.

They sank into a rhythm, a dangerous, devil-may-care rhythm. She felt like a dragon twined around a castle tower, powerful and sensual. Meg was working magic inside her, like a tiny brave and bewitching sorceress. Carrie moaned into the wind and inched larger from sheer arousal. She should hold still. She knew she should. 

 

Many thanks to @pseudo_size for beta reading and providing edits! It became a much stronger story with your suggestions.

Scroll to the read more if you want to jump right to the story.

 

Insertion—but from whose perspective?

Something occurred to me as I was writing and tinkering with point of view. It’s so rare to see a size kink insertion scene written from the perspective of the person being penetrated.

Anyone like me who’s a fan of insertion is probably familiar with the sensual tropes of a tiny’s POV as they admire, explore, and enter the body of a larger person. For me, when I’m feeling tiny, I get off the thought of being overwhelmed by the power of someone’s body. The incredible intimacy of experiencing your loving partner that way. Or the more intense fantasies that involve helplessness, humiliation, objectification, and darker themes. There’s a lot to like, no matter your interests.

The most common trope features a tiny man inserted into the vagina of a Giantess. Sometimes you’ll see a Giantess and a tiny woman. More rarely, other gender combinations.

Out of curiosity, I went to GiantessWorld.net, pulled up the insertion tag, and kept a tally of how many stories included F/f content. Full disclosure, I got bored of this after about eleven pages of scrolling. But out of roughly 220 stories, I counted about 65 that had F/f, or 29%. The GW tagging system doesn’t offer a category for the POV of the stories, but anyone who’s enjoyed this trope for long knows that most of them center the tiny’s perspective.

It would erase many genders represented in this kink community to say that centering the tiny’s perspective effectively centered the male gaze. But for many years, the people in the world most likely to create and commission kinky content were the ones with extra money and leisure time. So the artwork and erotica skewed towards the cis, straight, male gaze.

(“Male gaze” is a term coined by film critic Laura Mulvey in 1973 that describes the cinematic angle of a heterosexual man on a woman. “Essentially, the male gaze sees the female body as something for the heterosexual male (or patriarchal society as a whole) to watch, conquer, and possess and use to further their goals,” she wrote. Studies show it increases self-objectification and body shame in women. Luckily, careful and mindful application of kink is one way that a person can process feelings like that, but I digress.)

 

Some queer size kink history

Then Tumblr burst onto the scene. And revolutionized women’s sexual exploration and expression online. Especially queer women.

Finding the Giant/tiny size kink community on Tumblr in 2015 changed my life, because I was able to see I wasn’t an outlier as a woman in a space full of men. I was one of many women with this kink, in a space where male-centered content had reason to be vastly over-represented.

Tumblr changed all of that and empowered us to create and share the kinky fantasies that centered other perspectives.

From Elle Magazine’s 2018 article: Tumblr Was A Safe Space For Women To Consume Porn. Now It’s Banning Adult Content.

“With Tumblr, I was able to find and curate my site to my tastes, that’s what made it different,” she said. “I didn’t have to rely on mainstream adult content to tell me what should turn me on. [That] same drive to find sexual content that mirrors our own desires is the reason Tumblr porn was [or] is so popular with many women. The fact is A LOT of women consume and view porn… Less adult content focused on the male gaze and more focused on mutual pleasure and pleasuring — that’s what there needs to be more of and what Tumblr was able to foster.”

“Tumblr is the only website where if you search a tag like #lesbian you’ll get sex education, erotica, fan fiction, porn, coming out stories, and fashion.”

That ability to curate and tag search — Chase calls Tumblr “Pinterest for sex” — was instrumental. Sex could be ruled by sensibility, allowing vulnerable and underprivileged communities to connect and start exchanging real information along with nudes. To this day, the top-reviewed and most-followed porn Tumblrs include not just explicit-content curators, but blogs like Orgasmic Tips for Girls, which teaches women how to masturbate, or xxuntilweod, which mixes relatively vanilla clips of women kissing and holding hands with more graphic images of lesbian sex, letting women explore a whole range of queer intimacy without either sensationalizing or censoring it.

As the article points out, Tumblr banned NSFW content in 2018 thanks to SESTA/FOSTA legislation, and many queer and kink communities scattered to the four winds. Some of us made the jump to Twitter, Discord, or created our own blogs like this one.

I remember the frantic efforts we all made to back up our blogs and writing, which weren’t very successful. It hurts to think of all the content that I technically have, with garbled code, collecting dust in my cloud storage. I can share it here, but it would take a lot of effort to excavate it, and besides, the collaborative environment where those stories came to life are gone. It’s not quite the same.

And on a wider scale, so much was lost, but especially queer femme stories and perspectives. I miss the conversations badly. If I had shared these thoughts and this story on Tumblr, people would reblog it with their own comments, ideas, essays, stories, and it would just grow like this beautiful organic thing. Like a community mural, where people would pass by it from time to time and add more of themselves and their fantasies.

 

You said this was gonna be a funny story. WTF?

I know this is a serious introduction for a fun post. But it was on my mind when I realized the last time I saw an insertion scene from the perspective of a Giantess was on Tumblr.

I can’t even remember who wrote it. Was it one of those slap-dash collaborative efforts, where we built on each others’ work to riff off each other, challenge each other? Was it public roleplay? Or prose? A poem? Was it a simple exploration, a few paragraphs of pleasure? I can’t even recall details enough to ask my fellow alumni from the school of Tumblr sexual expression if they remember what I’m talking about.

The point is, plenty of people in this community don’t identify as male and exclusively tiny. And we deserve to see our own pleasure represented in size kink stories. Because sometimes I want to be overwhelmed—and sometimes I want to be the one who’s overwhelming.

The only solution I can think of is to create more content. Be the porn you want to see in the world!

 

Read the story

 

Carried Away

By Elle Largesse

Copyright 2021, all rights reserved

5084 words

 

Themes include unexpected growth, building destruction, some physical danger for the Giant and the tiny, a Giant in a tight space, bruises and light injury, breast play, oral sex, vaginal insertion, some feelings, and puns.

Sexual Brakes, Trauma, & Kink in the Burning 20’s

 

Tl;Dr: It’s okay if your brain and body want sex when you are stressed. It’s okay if they want it less. Both are normal—even during a pandemic and an uprising. There’s science to prove it. Research also shows that big feelings (like fear of getting sick, or anger at injustice) can be processed and released before they do lasting harm to you or your life. I share excerpts from Emily Nagoski’s book Come As You Are and two others to show how we might be able to use kink to do the same thing. 

This article is around 9300 words. If you’re not interested in the neuroscience of sexual brakes and accelerators or why we don’t have sex drives, you can skip to “How to stop stopping: taking your foot (and everything else) off the brake” to learn about using emotions to release stress. If you’re very low on energy and just want help, go to “Completing the cycle while (ahem) laying in bed” for my recipe on how to use size kink to achieve that catharsis.

(Content tags: This article contains mentions of the pandemic, police brutality, racism, violence, murder, assault, AIDS, PTSD, depression, anxiety, and trauma responses. It also covers topics ranging from BDSM and impact play, to polyamory, to microphilia/macrophilia, and covers size dysmorphia and kink-related fantasies.)

I didn’t expect that it would take a pandemic and a racial justice uprising for me to finally sit down and write a review about a phenomenal book on sex research for my kink blog. Here’s the reason I hope you’ll read this. People are having huge emotional responses that they don’t have the space or tools to fully process; they are also judging others/feeling ashamed for not wanting sex right now, while others are having the same response to those who do want sex right now. Research shows sex desire can decrease for some and increase for others during times of great stress, and that both are normal and healthy. Sex-positive spaces like #SizeTwitter should make space for both responses, and might already be able to provide tools to help process big emotions.

Taking Up Space

Portrait of Elle Largesse by DTV_art
Portrait of Elle Largesse by the talented DTV_art, https://twitter.com/dtv_art

Last weekend I reached 700 followers as @mightytinygiant on Twitter, and have decided to celebrate by sharing two things that are important to me. After nearly half a year on hiatus to heal from depression, it’s good to be back. I’m grateful for all the support I’ve received and the messages urging me to take care of myself. The writer is worth more than what they write.

The first thing I’m thrilled to share is this gorgeous portrait of me by the talented and friendly DTV_art. I have admired her work for years, since I first laid eyes on her Tumblr treasure trove of lovely queer Giantess girlfriends and sizeshifter boyfriends and so many gorgeous Giant/tiny moments. Trust me, she is so incredibly skilled and talented and awesome and her work is queer-friendly and romantic AF. I am humbled by the way she took my photograph and translated me into my most femme-tastic witchy woman sizeshifter self. As of this writing, she is still open for commissions!

The second celebratory tidbit I’m sharing with you lovely folks today is one of my favorite pieces of writing, first shared on Tumblr, January 12, 2016. I was struggling then with depression and size dysmorphia, just like I have been this year. I have made huge strides this summer with therapy—thank the Gods for sex-positive, kink-positive, polyam-friendly therapy—and for insurance to help me afford it. More people should have access to that kind of healing.

That support has given me the hope I needed to delve into my feelings about my body and my writing. I’ve been revisiting what I love most about what I’ve written. I’ve been working on befriending my body and accepting that the way she feels large or small may actually be healthy for me, even if it’s not a thing people commonly feel. Commissioning a portrait of myself as a new avatar is part of that work, and I’m grateful for DTV working with me to get it right.

It’s okay to feel small. It’s okay to feel large. It’s okay to take up whatever space you need to take up, in this world. I need this reminder now, as much as I ever have. Maybe you do, too.

 

TAKING UP SPACE

Sometimes when you grow, you’re scared of ruining your clothes or destroying your favorite pair of shoes. Sometimes you’re just scared of how they constrict you, how a necklace could choke you or a beloved coat could trap you like a straight-jacket. But not always.

Sometimes when you grow, shredding through your layers of fabric and fashion feels better than breaking a chain with your bare hands. You’re no longer made for the world of thrift shop jeans or business casual blouses. You can stop worrying if it looks wrong. It belongs to the person you used to be when you still apologized for taking up space.

Small wonder, then, when you stretch your shoulders just to feel the seams tear. When you breathe deeply so the hooks on your bra unbend themselves, unable to hold the glory of your breasts as they grow in size, weight, and consequence. You roll your hips and savor the shredding sound of that pencil skirt you used to love, which has been too small for far too long. It slips to the ground like a memory, followed quickly by the remains of your panties. The lace surrendered by unknitting itself. It wasn’t up to the task of containing the beauty of your other massive assets.

Tearing through the leather on your high heels seems almost obscene, but deep down you offer it like a sacrifice. Your bare feet fill the ground with presence. The crown of your head lifts above the crowd where you walked alone in your smallness.

You feel your own beauty as you never have before. With awe and gratitude and no regrets. You see the world differently and know yourself fully as you grow in all directions, pushing outward, but especially upward.

You have every right to stand tall no matter your size. Breathe deeply in the body that bears your heart, and never apologize again.

Size Dysmorphia: A Sizeshifter Origin Story

A small, pale human figure is shown reclining in a red and pink anatomical depiction of a heart. Veins, arteries, and capillaries twine around the tiny person's arms and legs like tree roots. Artwork credit to Shelia Liu.

Heart, by Shelia Liu[Shared under a Creative Commons Attribution, NonCommercial, NoDerivatives 4.0 License.]

Content warnings: some NSFW artwork and language, discussion of body dysmorphic disorder, gender dysphoria, grief, gun violence, depression, neurodivergence, kink, microphilia, macrophilia, and shame

 

Introduction: arguments with my body

It will come as no surprise to you that I’m sitting at a table in a chair with my feet on the ground, while my hands type comfortably on a laptop. You—and most of the people who know and love me—might be intrigued to know that my senses also tell me I can lift my hand and touch the ceiling with no trouble, because it’s dangerously close to brushing my head.

Would you like me to open the front door, fifteen feet away? It’s within easy reach. Or, at least, that’s the argument my body makes.

My senses agree I’m sitting at the table in the usual way, but they also feed me contradictory information about the walls seeming to close in around me, about how there’s no space for my knees and legs between the table and the wall, no way this chair should be able to support my weight, and no way that my fingers could possibly type on a laptop that feels like a toy for a doll.

If I close my eyes, the sensation intensifies and logic takes a backseat to a kinesthetic awareness of overwhelming size. Some days I feel overwhelming smallness instead, as if everything is huge and heavy and beyond my isolated reach.

Luckily for me, if I open my eyes again, I’m able to use the visual information to combat the strange, contradictory physical information. I concentrate on the evidence of my eyes and wage a war against my kinesthetic senses—the same kind of battle I’ve been fighting quietly since childhood.

In some circles, this experience is known as size dysmorphia: a sense that your body’s size feels larger or smaller than you know it to be.

I know that I stand five feet, two inches tall. I know that my body does not change in size. And yet, it’s as if some ancient part of my brain and body refuse to completely accept this data.

Sometimes it happens without warning, like a radio shifting channels and offering music and static from two different stations. Sometimes I go for days without noticing anything unusual, my broadcast uninterrupted on a steady playlist of “five-foot-two” with no interruptions.

When I feel a sizeshift coming on, sometimes I groan inwardly and grit my teeth. Other times, I try to induce the feeling myself, just for the sheer joy and arousal and exhilaration of it. Few sensations are as empowering as a sense that you stand twice as tall as everyone around you.

Until about three years ago, I refused to tell anyone.

I assumed I would take the secret to my grave.

 

ADULT CONTENT WARNING

This site includes content intended for adults only. Depending on your location, you must be at least 18 or 21 to enter. If you’re under 18 and are seeking sex positive resources, stop reading now and visit scarleteen.com.